FAQs

Is there a GUARANTEE?

We guarantee all work will be done in a professional and workmanlike manner to the specifications in the contract. If you need any information related to your job ask FAQs frequently. Our work will meet or exceed standards set by the American National Institute.

Do I need to be home for the estimate?

You don’t need to be home. On the initial call, our staff will document all requests for work to be done, mark all circuits to be rewired(if possible), and request a phone number you can be reached at in the event we have any questions while we are at your location.

Are you fully licensed and insured?

Yes. Worcester Electrician Services meets or exceeds the legal requirements for licensing and insurance as required by each state in which we operate. Rest assured, each job carries liability coverage to protect your property from harm and workers’ compensation insurance for our employees.

When is it time to call an electrician?

When you are resetting circuit breakers or changing fuses too often. When you turn on your air conditioner and the lights dim in the room. When your lights flicker or go on and off. When you can smell electricity burning. When you have six electronic devices going into one outlet in back of your electronics center. When you have receptacle outlets overburdened by multi-plug strips. When a three-prong plug needs a two-prong adapter. If you have to run extension cords to plug in electrical devices.

What size electrical service system do I install in my home?

Most states call for 100 amps minimum, but with all the new electronic devices, air conditioning and electric heat, I would suggest 200 amps especially in new homes. This also gives you some space for future additions. This is not a job for an unlicensed person to attempt. In most cases it involves replacing everything from the service loop (this is the wire that extends from the top of your meter to the utility tie in ) up to and including the main panel.

What are the common Electrical Acronyms and what do they stand for?

G.F.I. – Ground fault circuit interrupter. It is an electrical wiring device that disconnects a circuit whenever it detects that the electric current is not balanced between the energized conductor and the return neutral conductor. Such an imbalance may indicate current leakage through the body of a person who is grounded and accidentally touching the energized part of the circuit. A lethal shock can result from these conditions. GFCIs are designed to disconnect quickly enough to prevent injury caused by such shocks. They are not intended to provide protection against over-current (overload) or short-circuit conditions.

Are there outlets manufactured especially to stand up to outdoor use?

Yes, you can purchase specially manufactured weather-resistant electrical receptacles. These are subjected to extra stringent requirements and tested for their resistance to factors such as exposure to intense cold or ultra-violet light.

What is the difference between a breaker panel and my old fuse panel?

Both devices, either breaker or fuse, are designed to trip (turn off) in the event of an electrical overload, i.e. 20amps of electrical load on a 15amp circuit would cause a trip. The only difference is that a breaker is mechanical and may be reset, whereas, a fuse is one time only and must be replaced. Please Note: Modern breakers are much more efficient and offer greater levels of protection

How much electrical work should I attempt on my own?

At the present time most states allow you to do whatever you want in your own home. But, doing electrical work yourself is dangerous and could result in costly repairs as well as making more problems within your home’s system. How much are you willing to risk to save money?

There is a reason why it takes so much training to become an electrician. Do not make a mistake by taking electricity lightly, even the smallest job could be a safety hazard. Why take a chance. Get a professional to do this work.Also In some states the homeowner can pull his own Electrical permit for work in his single family home, what he does not know is that in case of damage or fire caused by his work, his homeowners insurance will not pay, they will only if the work is done by a licensed Electrical Contractor. You should check with your homeowners Insurance Co., and they should sign a document or something to this effect to acknowledge this when they pull a permit.The most dangerous time is when you tell yourself. This is easy. I can do it myself. Why should i get an electrician? Then, when you don’t remember where all those wires went or your hair is standing straight up, you say to yourself, “Well maybe we better call someone to straighten up this mess.”

Now it will cost you double what you thought you were going to save in the beginning.

FAQs